Local Governments Exaggerate Growth

New census data says Southern Nevada local governments have exaggerated their growth to the tune of about three years worth of our current growth rate.

The Las Vegas Review Journal reports the story…

The Census Bureau says the Metro area hit 1.866-million last June 30, vs. local government estimates (passed up to the State Demographer before becoming “official”) that had us at just under 2-million. The difference is more than six percent, equal to three years of our current pace of 2% annual growth.

Cities and Counties in …

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Nevada’s Stimulus Projects

Stimulus Watch has built a website that details each state’s “stimulus” projects. Nevada’s totals $1.5-billion, not including the Peidtrain.

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Washington Hands Us A Bucket

I cannot more highly recommend this graphic, from the Washington Post.

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Peid Train Stimulates Vegas

(Peid is a contraction of Pelosi-Reid and rhymes with “speed”)

The stimulus package passed tonight apparently includes $8-billion for a Vegas-to-Riverside Peid Train.

It will have less capacity than Southwest Airlines, and will take longer. Hopefully, it will cost less to ride. Otherwise, we’ll have to outlaw Southwest Airlines.

Plus or minus, the Peid Train divides out to $4,000 per man, woman and child in Las Vegas. The burden will fall on our grandchildren, since this Congress and President lack the morality to actually fund their lardfest by …

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NPRI Prints The List

When government takes money, it does so a little bit per taxpayer. When it spends money, it does so a lot per recipient. That’s why those who govern always find it easier to raise taxes than slow the rate of increase in government spending – there’s less complaining.

A rarity in the debate is an actual list of places to cut spending. Such a list was released this week over at the Nevada Policy Research Institute. Here it is.

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State Archivist Departs Urging Tax Shift From Tourists To Residents

Nevada’s State Archivist Guy Rocha made the front page of the newspaper with news of his retirement. He offered, in addition to his usual ability to fascinate with his command of Nevada history, some political views. For example:

“I find it disturbing this state that has essentially been my life is, in my opinion, on the brink of disaster. You can’t cut 34 percent or more without devastating state government”… Rocha fears legislators in the coming session will cut state spending so severely that it might …

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Henderson Budget Cuts

Although Henderson elected officials complained of cutting budgets just last week, this week they were flush enough to expand their already-expansive legislative lobbying effort by a quarter-million dollars.

Local governments in Nevada spend lavishly to lobby the legislature.

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Revenue Forecasting for Nevada’s State Government

Prior to the 1980’s, the Nevada Legislature approached spending with a measured, responsible eye. Over a couple of years back then, it converted to push hard for more and more spending every session. This attitude was not a function of Nevada’s growth rate, which has run at a constant rate since the 1960s.

During the late 80s and early 90s, the Legislature’s zeal to spend led to an embarrassing series of “budget cuts” caused by the Legislature’s aggressive forecasts of revenue. They planned unrealistic increases in …

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Nevada Legislature Special Session

The Nevada Legislature reduced their plans to increase spending by $73-million dollars, but squeezed savings accounts and borrowed money in order to increase spending by another $267-million dollars during a special session Monday.

Here’s coverage from the Review Journal.

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Imaginary Budget Cuts

When a Nevada political leader tells you that we’re facing 30% budget cuts, you can be sure that they are an employee, contractor or other direct beneficiary of government spending. Because it’s just not true.

Here’s a great post from NPRI showing the reality of Nevada’s taxes, including the latest projection:

YEAR

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

% Change

31.7%

14.1%

11.5%

2.8%

-2.9%

-9.1%

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